Citation

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Ethnicity-Specific Differences in Liver Transplant Outcomes Among Adults With Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: 20052017 United Network for Organ Sharing/Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

Bayable, A;Ohabughiro, M;Cheung, R;Wong, R;

Background & aims

Lack of effective medical therapies for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) leads to continued disease progression to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). Few studies have specifically evaluated whether ethnic disparities in LT outcomes exist among adults awaiting LT. We aimed to evaluate ethnicity-specific differences in LT outcomes among adults with PSC in the US.

Methods

We retrospectively evaluated US adults (aged ≥ 18 years) with PSC without hepatocellular carcinoma listed for LT using the 2005–2017 United Network for Organ Sharing database. Ethnicity-specific differences in overall waitlist survival and probability of receiving LT were evaluated using competing risks regression analyses and adjusted multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Overall survival after LT was evaluated with Kaplan-Meier methods and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models.

Results

Among 4046 patients with PSC listed for LT (69.2% men, 82.2% non-Hispanic white, 12.4% African American, 3.9% Hispanic, 1.6% Asian), significantly higher risk of waitlist death was men vs. women (Standardized hazard ratio (SHR) = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.05–2.12, P = 0.025), but no ethnicity-specific differences were observed. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics had significantly lower probability of receiving LT (SHR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.54–0.98, P = 0.035). Among patients with PSC and end-stage liver disease who underwent LT, African Americans had significantly higher risk of post-LT death compared with non-Hispanic whites (SHR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.21–2.32, P = 0.002).

Conclusions

Among a large cohort of US adults with PSC awaiting LT, significant ethnicity-specific disparities in LT outcomes were observed. Lower probability of LT in Hispanics and significantly higher risk of post-LT death in African Americans were observed.