Citation

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Identificao neuroanatmica de reas cerebrais relacionadas produo do canto em uma espcie de pssaro Suboscine da Amaznia (Myiozetetes cayanensis)

Brito, ML;

The scientific community, over the years, has proven vocal learning in three orders of birds (parrots, hummingbirds and dark passerines). More recently, however, studies of three species of Suboscines, Sayornis Phoebe, Procnias tricarunculata and Chiroxiphia linearis have revealed the existence of a rudimentary singing system and / or extensive quantitative and qualitative vocal variations among reproductive populations, suggesting that these species are capable to learn your singing. This evidence prompts research on other species of Suboscine birds, since the distinction between apprentic birds and non-vocal learners is not as obvious as previously thought. A species of bird Suboscines amazonica, Myiozetetes cayanensis, awakens our interest due to the structural complexity of duet singing that may infer some singing learning. In order to identify the regions of control of the production of the chant in these animals, we used different techniques of cellular marking of Nissl, radioactive in situ hybridization and injection of neuronal tracers; neuroanatomical tools that have given us clues about the presence of brain areas potentially involved in the singing control system. Of the three nuclei involved in the production of the corner, we were able to identify only the hypoglossal nucleus - tracheosiringeal portion (NXIIts) and only through the injection of the CTB neuron tracer. We identified the NXIIts in both males and females and in quantifying the data we verified that the volume of this nucleus is 2 times higher in males than in females, inferring a possible sexual dimorphism. When comparing the total volume of NXIIts between our experimental animal and a species of Oscine bird, Taeniopigia guttata, we found that this nucleus was almost 2 times larger in male and female Taeniopigia guttata. No telencephalic nuclei have been identified that resemble HVC and Oscines RA by any of the techniques used, which leads us to conclude that in Myiozetetes cayanensis, there is no control system of the singing and that its song is innate Taeniopigia guttata, we found that this nucleus was almost 2 times larger in male and female Taeniopigia guttata. No telencephalic nuclei have been identified that resemble HVC and Oscines RA by any of the techniques used, which leads us to conclude that in Myiozetetes cayanensis, there is no control system of the singing and that its song is innate Taeniopigia guttata, we found that this nucleus was almost 2 times larger in male and female Taeniopigia guttata. No telencephalic nuclei have been identified that resemble HVC and Oscines RA by any of the techniques used, which leads us to conclude that in Myiozetetes cayanensis, there is no control system of the singing and that its song is innate